May 14, 2016

Emergency Services

Emergency Services are an important part of the CAP mission. Mission-certified scanners, observers, and pilots fly both training and actual sorties. In Arizona, this may involve missions such as looking for forest fires while on training missions, ensuring that the Barry M. Goldwater Gunnery Range is clear of any people or vehicles before USAF or USMC aircraft conduct air-to-ground bombing practice, and documenting disasters such as flooding for local, state, or national emergency agencies.

CAP Ground Search and Rescue teams also play an integral role. Some searches are best conducted on the ground rather than from the air. The Arizona Wing Ground SAR Team, winner of multiple national awards, includes cadets, senior members, and search dogs.

Some additional information about the CAP Emergency Services role:

▲CAP conducts 90 percent of inland search and rescue in the U.S. as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and other agencies.

▲ Coordinates Air Force-assigned missions through CAP National Operations Center at Maxwell AFB, Ala., at a cost of less than $175 per flying hour.

▲ Performs aerial reconnaissance for Homeland Security. 

▲ Saves an average of 78 lives per year.

▲ Provides disaster-relief support to local, state and national agencies.

▲ Transports time-sensitive medical materials, blood products and body tissues when commercial resources are unavailable.

▲ Provides air intercept training, impact assessment, light transport, communications support and low-level route surveys for the Air Force.

▲ Assists federal, state and local law enforcement agencies in the War on Drugs.

▲ Maintains an extensive VHF and HF communications network.

You do not have to be a pilot to be a member of a CAP aircraft crew. Mission scanners sit in the left rear seat of the Cessna 182 and take digital photos of what they see in the search area. Mission observers sit in the right front seat where they are watching the ground but also assist the pilot with the G1000 avionics, radio communications, etc. Members must progress through training, starting with scanner, then observer, before qualifying to be a mission pilot. Ground team members also complete a certification/training process in order to serve on the team.

Emergency Services Officer: Maj Chris Dusard
Alerting Officer: 2nd Lt Steve Barnes